Zoos & Wildlife
You can read all you want in a book, but there is nothing like seeing the objects of your study up-close and personal when you visit a zoo, nature preserve, aquarium, or wildlife sanctuary. Visit the animal kingdom here in Colorado, and you'll find a fun and interesting way to learn more about the natural world.
Colorado Zoos & Wildlife
Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center
CWWC conducts guided educational tours and programs that focus on dispelling myths about wolves and wild canids and helping people to appreciate the roles wolves play in their ecosystems. Tours cover topics such as pack hierarchy, territory, communication, prey impact, and conservation. What is unique about the tour is that people also learn about the history of each wolf, coyote, and fox at the center. Some of these being personal rescue stories and unique personalities of many. Although some of our animals have been rescued from college dorms, roadside zoos, photo farms, and the fur industry, we also have adopted ones from other educational organizations as well. The history of the animals compels visitors to walk away with a compassionate respect to honor the fact that “wild means wild.”
Denver Zoological Gardens
The Denver Zoo houses more than 4,000 animals representing nearly 685 species, and the nation's first environmentally-friendly natural gas-powered zoo train. The new 5,500 square-foot Dragons of Komodo exhibit for the rare Komodo dragon features the largest indoor habitat for Komodo dragons in North America. The Denver Zoo's other state-of-the-art exhibits include Tropical Discovery, an indoor rainforest where visitors journey past waterfalls, darkened caves, jungle ruins and tropical riverbank exhibits, and Primate Panorama, which spans seven acres and exhibits 29 of the world's most spectacular species of primates and features a one-acre habitat for the endangered western lowland gorilla.
The Wild Animal Sanctuary
The Wild Animal Sanctuary is a state and federally licensed zoological facility and a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. We are located outside of Keenesburg, Colorado, 30 miles northeast of Denver. We are located on rural, rolling grasslands, comprising 720 acres and sheltering more than 290 large carnivores alone. TWAS is the largest sanctuary of its kind and one of the oldest in the United States.
Colorado Gators Reptile Park
Colorado Gators is a family oriented, educational facility that focuses on full use of natural and recycled resources. Our goal is to maintain an integrated ecosystem while providing educational opportunities and viable farm products. Every visitor to Colorado Gators has the opportunity to meet, pet, hold, and take pictures with a little alligator. There are several large African Sulcata tortoises that wander freely throughout their section of the park. You can also see an albino alligator, Nile crocodiles, Burmese pythons, anacondas, and other reptiles.
Butterfly Pavilion
The Butterfly Pavilion is home to over 5,000 animals, including Rosie the Tarantula, sea creatures, and over 1,600 butterflies. After walking through the tropical rainforest pavilion, explore the gardens and nature trails outside. They offer education programs for groups.
Cheyenne Mountain Zoo
Situated on 146-acres, 70 of which are developed, at an elevation of 6,800 feet in Colorado Springs, the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo is the only mountain zoo in the United States. The Zoo is home to more than 600 animals representing some 142 species from around the world, over 30 of which are classified as endangered or threatened. Special features include Primate World, Wolf Woods, Asian Highlands, and Lion’s Lair, My Big Backyard, and the African Rift Valley. A leader in conservation, captive breeding and animal care, Cheyenne Mountain Zoo connects people with wildlife and wild places through experiences that inspire action.
The Wildlife Experience
Founded in 2002 as a wildlife art and natural history museum designed to serve as a cultural center and community asset for South Metro Denver. The 151,000 sq ft prairie mission style facility hosts numerous fine art, natural history and interactive science changing exhibits each year, in addition to its signature permanent exhibition, Globeology, featuring open dioramas interpreting eight biomes of the world. The Wildlife Experience strives to inspire a new generation of conservationists and outdoors enthusiasts by bringing visitors closer to wildlife and fostering the desire to experience the outdoors through high-quality exhibitions, large screen movies and a host of education programs.
Rocky Mountain Arsenal
Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge is one of the largest urban wildlife refuges in the nation with more than 15,000 acres of land. It’s a place where wildlife thrives and where visitors can reconnect with nature and experience the many wildlife-dependent opportunities the Refuge has to offer. Come walk the many easy hiking trails, take the self-guided Wildlife Drive auto tour, observe more than 330 species of wildlife, and explore the Visitor Center.
Plains Conservation Center
The Plains Conservation Center exists to bring the natural wonder of the prairie into the realm of personal experience by: preserving a remnant of the eastern Colorado High Plains, educating the public about its natural and cultural heritage and nurturing sound conservation and environmental ethics. A visit to the Plains Conservation Center offers a unique way to experience the natural and cultural heritage of the High Plains of Colorado.
Pueblo Zoo
The Pueblo Zoo covers 25 acres, is located in Pueblo City Park and was established in the 1920's. It is easily accessible for all visitors including those using strollers & wheelchairs. The zoo exhibits more than 300 animals of 110 different species from throughout the world. Under the Zoological Society's direction, the zoo is being developed as a "biopark," a place where animals are exhibited in natural settings, where the interdependence of Earth's life - plants and animals, including humans - is made clear for all to see. Among its exhibits are the African Lion exhibit; the Ecocenter, where visitors will find a tropical rainforest and the Black-footed penguin exhibit; the Herpetarium, which houses a collection of cold-blooded creatures including reptiles, amphibians and insects; the education building, which houses the hands-on Mahlon T. White Discovery Room; and the Pioneer Farm with its many domestic animals that can be fed by visitors.
Downtown Aquarium
Located in downtown Denver, This world-class aquarium doesn't just display underwater creatures - it recreates their habitats and tells a story of two great rivers and their journeys to the ocean -- the Colorado River as it flows to Mexico's Sea of Cortez, and Indonesia’s Kampar River along its journey to the South China Sea. The aquarium displays 15,000 specimens, representing 300 species of fish, birds, mammals, and invertebrates, including tigers and sea otters, living amidst 1,000 live plants.
Rocky Mountain Raptor Program
For 33 years, Rocky Mountain Raptor Program has served the northern Colorado community through rescue, rehabilitation & release of injured birds of prey. Our community-based team of veterinary experts and specially trained volunteers provides all aspects of raptor care ranging from compassionate medical care to constructing cages that serve as temporary homes for recovering birds. Rocky Mountain Raptor Program also plays a vital role in community education and outreach, providing hands-on learning about raptor species and the environment. Private Behind the Scenes Tours explore the main rehabilitation facility on Vine Drive, including various work areas and some of the caging facilities. Visitors will learn about medical management of cases, how the RMRP trains and coordinates volunteers and staff to provide care for the birds 365 days/year. Injuries, therapies, and issues involved in caring for raptors are discussed. The tour may include an opportunity to meet an educational raptor.
Buffalo Herd Nature Preserve
The County of Denver maintains this buffalo herd about twenty miles west of the city. The bison are direct descendants of the last wild herd of bison in the U.S. They all came from a herd of 7 bison brought from Yellowstone National Park in 1914. The bison herd can be seen from I-70 when heading west into the mountains on the right right side of the road.
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